How to make a Fondant Rose - Food Gypsy

Technique – How to make a Fondant Rose

Published On February 16, 2011 | By Gypsy | Gastronomy, Tips & Techniques

As an added Valentine’s Week Bonus Feature. Tossing a little pastry technique your way compliments of Wendy van Velthonven from Thimble Cakes in Ottawa,  ‘how to make a fondant rose’.  Having fun in the kitchen.    

A home (and YouTube) schooled cook; Wendy began baking  and cooking  as a means of survival when she became a vegan years ago.  For years she sold special occasion cakes from her home kitchen, developing a steady and loyal clientele who actively encouraged her to expand into retail, where she now makes a line of stunning product, all hand finished and beautifully decorated.

While a guest in her kitchen, got my hands dirty with a little sugar and flour making a little ‘Gypsy’ rose and now you can do the same in your kitchen.

What you need…

  • Fondant

  • Red & green food colouring

Blend food coloring with small amount (1/4 cup or less) of plain fondant in a bowl until desired colour is attained.

Gypsy Note:  Wilton fondant is often available at specialty food and baking stores including Michael’s and Bulk Barn.  It can be costly and is not known for its taste.  In Ottawa, Artistic Cake Design (1390 Clyde Ave. Unit 106-107 Nepean, ON (877) 661-6909) makes and sells their own tasty version.

When decorating cupcakes you really don’t need much, fondant goes a surprising long way.  Luckily it keeps and freezes well. 

Making a fondant rose…

  1. Pinch off a small piece of red fondant (about the size of the tip of your thumb).
  2. Form a small ball by rolling fondant between your hands.
  3. Roll ball between palms to form a tube, slightly tapered at both ends.
  4. Gently flatten tube between your fingers to make a flat “worm”.
  5. Starting at one end, simply roll fondant into a tight ball to form a rose shape.
  6. Pinch excess off back to secure and ‘open’ the petals.
  7. Brush excess flour off surface with dry pastry brush.
  8. Place gently on cake at desired location.

Roll flat, tapered tube into itself... Roll to form larger or teeny, tiny roses Pinch excess off back to 'open' petals

For the leaves…

  1. Pinch off a small piece of green fondant (about the size of the tip of your pinky finger).
  2. Form a small ball by rolling fondant between your hands.
  3. Roll ball between palms to form a tube, slightly round at both ends.
  4. Gently flatten tube between your fingers to make a flat “worm”.
  5. Pinch in the middle to form a two leaves and remove excess.
  6. Using your thumb nail, gently score a line down the centre and, if desired, veins in leaves.
  7. Brush excess flour off surface with dry pastry brush.

Pinch, rounded flat tube in the middle... ... separate to form two leaves Brush away any traces of flour...

If your fondant gets a little dry, simply wet your hands and work the moisture into the fondant until it is once again smooth or, dampen with hands and wrap tightly in plastic wrap for about 10 minutes and then gently knead – same effect. 

Leftover fondant can be wrapped tightly in plastic wrap or sealed in an airtight container and stored in the fridge or freezer until next time.

Cupcake season has only just begun… you’ll be the star of the neighbourhood. 

Happy Decorating!

Stop and see the gang at Thimble Cakes and if you have the time, have a cup of (organic) coffee and  hang out to watch the staff ice and decorate in the open concept finishing area of the bakery.  It’s… relaxing.

Thimble Cakes    369 Bank Street
Ottawa, Ontario

 http://www.thimblecakes.ca/

 613-695-0109

Piping bags, Thimble Cakes

Buttercream, just waiting for yummy Thimble Cakes

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About The Author

"Gypsy" is not my real name." A freelance food & travel writer & photographer based in Aylmer, Quebec. Corinna Horton trained at Le Cordon Bleu, spent five years as the owner of Nova Scotia's Dragonfly Inn, and is currently between big, shiny kitchens as she focuses on family and what's next in this delicious life.

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